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Upper School

The Marshall Upper School prepares students to be leaders in their communities, facilitators of their life-long learning experiences, and contributors to a more just and empathetic world. Educators create learning environments that inspire, broaden perspective, form connections, develop agency, and build community. A learning model that incorporates high academic standards and student-centered learning develops students’ abilities to solve problems, communicate effectively, think curiously and creatively, become engaged and ethical citizens, and develop agency and resiliency. The upper school experience is intentionally built to engage students and meet them where they are at, both academically and social-emotionally. The upper school community strives for students to have authentic and meaningful connections with other students, with their teachers, and with other community members. Students learn to think critically, work collaboratively, act courageously, and live compassionately. Through a variety of learning experiences, students gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for the diverse perspectives and experiences of those around them. 

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Upper School Curriculum

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Upper School Faculty

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Dylan Chernov

Dylan Chernov

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Cassie Erdmann

Cassie Erdmann

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Heather Fishel

Heather Fishel

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Sally Goodman

Sally Goodman

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1 2 3 8 > showing 1 - 4 of 31 constituents
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Science Lab Photo

A Look Inside...
Marshall Curriculum


Marshall chemistry students spent a couple of class periods learning how to create their own hand sanitizer. They mix ethanol and water, and bring it to a boil. But, of course, the boiling points for the two liquids are different, so that's where the learning happens. After two days of trials, some of the student teams actually cheered as their first drops of sanitizer traveled through the condenser and into the collection bottle.

A Look Inside...
Marshall Curriculum


Seniors in Dr. Nygaard's class have celebrated Edwin Morgan Day for twenty years, and most will have stories to tell about that memorable class period. The tradition, a full description of which will remain intentionally vague, began when members of the class of 2002 sent a letter to the famous Scottish poet, asking lots of questions about one of his poems.